About your Search

20130201
20130228
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7
for television. season one begins monday night at 9:00 a.m. -- at 9:00 p.m. eastern and pacific. >> u.s. army chief of staff general raymond odierno says the greatest threat facing our nation is the fiscal uncertainty and potential budget cut -- but it sure call. hort falls. he made these remarks at the brookings institution. this is just over an hour. >> good morning, everyone, and on behalf of brookings and our center for 21st century security, we're honored to have the chief of staff of the army, general ray odierno, to speak. you are aware of the challenges of the budget process and our future military planning as well as current operations. no one could be more distinguished and a more thoughtful person to discuss these matters than general odierno, who is a friend of brookings and the broader defense community for a long time, and he has been a distinguished servant in our nation's military and defense throughout that time. he took the fourth infantry division to iraq and presided over its operation, directed its operations in the first year of the iraq war. then he returned as the mult
opportunity for us. >> the future of consumer technology with samsung vp for strategy david steel from this year's ces show. >> president obama and congressional leaders spoke about faith in public life at this year's fellowship foundation national prayer breakfast in washington. the national prayer breakfast dates back to 1953 with president eisenhower. otheralso hear from guests. this is 90 minutes. ♪ [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states and mrs. michelle obama. ♪ [applause] >> a good morning. we have had a wonderful time together to discuss issues and had a joyful time together. we thank you for your attention. mark, is overwhelming -- you can all have a seat, i'm sorry. please have a seat. >> you never know. >> it is overwhelming to think of the pathway that each person took to get to this event today. some from little villages halfway around the world, and some from the 12 blocks away. thank you all for coming. this year's event, which has taken place for 61 years now, began with a group of people who happen to be leaders wanting to get togeth
cruz of texas. thank you for joining us at this committee hearing, as well as my other colleagues. i also want to thank senator pat leahy for giving us the opportunity to have this hearing today. we are pleased to have such a large audience for the hearing. it demonstrates the importance of this issue. at the outset, i want to note that the rules of the senate prevent outbursts or clapping or demonstrations of any kind during these hearings. there was so much interest in today's hearings that we had to expand opportunity for the audience in an adjoining room. the overflow room is 226 of the dirksen building. i will make opening remarks and give ranking member cruz the same opportunity and then welcome our first witness. we are here to discuss a critically important issue, maybe a very basic question. we venerate in this country are committed to the life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness of those who live in america. we also guaranteed under our bill of rights the right to bear arms. can we make these two consistent? can we protect a person's right to own a firearm and still say
, and how to present the program, how to do what you're doing now. host: your in the u.s., based in afghanistan, what are you doing here in washington? guest: i am here to say that open media in afghanistan is a big achievement. not only for the public, but for everyone i want to say that this is a big achievement after 11 years we lost more than 39 journalists from 2001 up until now, more than hundreds of injuries, more than thousands of arrests and people who were insulted and faced with harassment. let's not lose this achievement. a side of focus on security forces, stress fractures in afghanistan, focusing on media for lots of afghan people. afghans are quite aware what is freedom of expression and how they can use it in their daily lives. let's focus on it and not lose it. host: while you're in u.s., are you having to justify the money you are receiving? guest: yes, i have to justify the money we are receiving and say that not only for nai media institute, or the organizations we are receiving the money from, from ucid, the sector, the deal is something to really need focus.
aware what is freedom of expression. how they can use it in their daily lives. let's focus on and not pollute it. >> what you are a share in washington, who are you talking to? are you having to justify the money you are receiving from the united states? >> yes, just to justify the money we are receiving, not only for the organization. defector, the field is something they really focus. >> in afghanistan we have different rules of receiving information it is a radio. all over the country. it is mostly popular in the city's that we have that. printed media is also more of a usable thing or a tool and the places people are in a couple. nowadays we are having social media where people are receiving the news. more than the 3% of the population of afghanistan through radio. >> you mentioned the literacy rates. here in afghanistan, literacy rate over all 28%. mail literacy -- average imasco years is a 11 average. female 7. given the and the numbers, how difficult is your job of getting a promotion to afghanis. >> when you see 20% of the population is more than 72% are eligible, i
to millions. bill clinton has taught us that while hope is a powerful motivator, it takes more than that to build the future we dream of. as we revitalize our discussion about how to renew the american dream, i ask you to join me in welcoming a great proponent of the american dream, the honorable william jefferson clinton. [applause] >> thank you very much. thank you. thank you. thank you. thank you very much. thank you. thank you. thank you. thank you. >> we miss you. >> thank you. sometimes, i miss you. [laughter] most of the time, i like what i am doing. i want to thank steny for the introduction. we talked a few days ago when he said, what do you want me to say? i said, tell them you like playing golf with me. and that you did not throw the games. i want to congratulate and thank nancy pelosi for her tireless efforts in the last election cycle and all of her leadership. thank you, joe kelly, my fellow new yorker. i understand she had to leave, but i was always reassured to see her on television when i was worried about the outcome. i want to thank steve israel, who i think has b
of the analytical frameworks we use at georgetown law is what i call lp4. i means -- analyze things in terms of five aspects. look at an issue at the intersection of law and policy. l is law. the first p is process, which produces the law. the next p is policy. policy drives the process, which produces the law. the next p is politics. sometimes that is tough to disaggregate from policy. if we define politics as the acquisition, maintenance, and use of power, that is distinct from the substantial policy issues. the final p is personality. individuals matter, some individual personalities, especially so. it influences the entire flow. we will hit on a number of these aspects of the law policy intersection. as we talk with the expert individuals who represent a number of interest groups that are tremendously influential to the flow of law and policy in washington, and the congressional article i process. to my immediate right is sara chieffo. she is the legislative director for the league of conservation voters. the league works to turn environmental values into national priorities. sara chieffo plays
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7